Complete guide to business expenses: trains, planes, automobiles… and bicycles » SMEInsider

Complete guide to business expenses: trains, planes, automobiles… and bicycles

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Back to: Complete guide to business expenses: what can I claim as a business expense?

If your job requires you to travel to somewhere other than your normal workplace, these costs can be claimed back. Make sure that you keep hold of receipts and/or original tickets for flights, trains and other public transport journeys. Food and accommodation costs also come under “travel and subsistence,” so if you need to stay in an overnight hotel or buy lunch for your team whilst away working for a client, these are also valid expenses. Bear in mind, though, that things once classed as “entertaining” – taking clients out for drinks, lunch, dinner, etc. – are no longer considered to be valid, tax-deductible expenses.

If you need to use your car or van for work trips, you can also claim back the costs of fuel at 45p for the first 10,000 miles and 25p thereafter. For motorbikes, it’s 24p per mile, no matter how many you do. Even cyclists can claim 20p per mile for work-related journeys – meaning that you’re not only burning calories, saving money and protecting the environment, you’re getting a financial reward for it, too.

Note that these claims can only be made for out-of-the-way trips, not everyday commuting. If you drive, cycle or take public transport to the same workplace every day, that doesn’t count. Client meetings, business trips and work done onsite can all be claimed for – just remember to keep records of dates, mileage and details of all work journeys for accounting purposes. A car mileage meter can be handy for keeping in track, or a quick Google Map search will tell you how many miles you need to travel between locations.

See also:

Complete guide to business expenses: working from home

Complete guide to business expenses: equipment and furniture

Complete guide to business expenses: tools and specialist clothing

Complete guide to business expenses: professional services, subscriptions and memberships

HMRC information on tax-deductible expenses